14 Responses

  1. Carmen Waterman
    | Reply

    I am so proud of you. I know how hard you have worked to learn and explore the daunting role of teaching yoga. You are amazing, and seeing the glow in your face and eyes when you have finished a session is a testimony of the benefits this practise can bring. Your gentle voice and kind and caring heart is a big part of what will make you a teacher that will make a difference to many. You are right that so often we don’t even venture to begin something because we fear we will never be able to finish it. Self-doubt is a hard task master and the only way to beat it, is to take that deep breath to begin, and when life’s interruptions and illness takes us away for a time, to take that deep breath again and get back at it. You will do this, you will be an amazing teacher and you can do anything you dream of. You are an inspiration and I believe in you.

    • Jane Waterman
      | Reply

      I found this thread of comments that I meant to reply to long ago. Even with all the time that’s passed, I still wanted to say thank you. Your love and support has always been there for me, and it’s only thanks to you that I am living this dream, and being able to teach twice a week. It’s also thanks to you that I am learning to be gentle with myself and taking baby steps towards my dreams.

      I love you always!

  2. Barb
    | Reply

    :) Dearest, beautiful, wise Blackbird,
    There is no possible way that I am the only one who benefits from your willingness to begin. How fantastic it is that you’ve learned yoga, to gently teach others how to begin. I’m glad you began that, I’m glad you blog about your struggles and triumphs, and glad to be so blessed to have come to know you.

    I so relate to the fear of beginning…

    Because, you know, I might fail… or heaven help me, I might succeed (‘crazy’ as that sounds). So many things I haven’t begun… so many rationalisations…

    Fear of failure… well that’s obvious… you’re not good enough, you won’t get it right, you’ll never finish… and so it goes.

    Fear of success… that’s a tougher one, but I totally get it now… because what if I AM successful? what if I am capable of accomplishing this? what if I’m not a loser? Well, then what? There’s this whole new scary world to consider… like… then who/what am I? and if they were all wrong, those that would have me believe I’m not all that… well… then what? Then do I have to deal with the feelings about how mean that was and how much it hurt me?

    Anyway, this was just supposed to let you know how much I treasure you and all you are (and aren’t), and how much I hope you continue on, in whatever way you can. It will be enough. You are enough.

    Just look at how much you inspired me to write today. :)

    • Jane Waterman
      | Reply

      I found this thread of comments that I meant to reply to long ago. Even with all the time that’s passed, I still wanted to say thank you. Right now I still struggle with the fear of beginning, so perhaps it’s no coincidence I’m back in this thread today, reading my post, and reading the comments.

      I don’t think it crazy, or if it is, I’m crazy too, as I’m still struggling with both the fear of failure, and the fear of success and all that entails. Some days I wonder what it is I’m so afraid of, but maybe I’m just afraid of feeling?

      Thank you for always being a support and for validating and mirroring what I think and feel. It’s nice not to be alone here, wherever it is I am!

      Lots of love always. *HUGS* <3

  3. India
    | Reply

    How wonderful all this change is. I see amazing things in your future. I am so very proud of you!

    • Jane Waterman
      | Reply

      Thank you, Sweetheart – I am so blessed by your friendship! All my love. <3

  4. Jan
    | Reply

    Not only did you take that brave first step, dear one, now you’ll be able to ease and encourage others into that same step/leap because you understand exactly how they feel … probably much better than most yoga teachers.

    I can’t count how many times I’ve been told: “Yoga would help your back problems/arthritis.” I can’t count how many times I’ve thought: “There’s NO way I could possibly get myself into those positions; and if I somehow managed it, I’d be stuck forever!” I think right now, “Yoga with 2 artificial (bright pink) hips would lead to some sort of mini-disaster”. And yes, I’d be totally embarrassed at my lack of flexibility in front of others who pose like elastic bands.

    Now … I wonder. I wonder.

    • Jane Waterman
      | Reply

      I found this thread of comments that I meant to reply to long ago. Even with all the time that’s passed, I still wanted to say thank you for writing here.

      Now that I’m a “veteran” of teaching chair yoga (definitely LOL here), I have seen that yoga is not the path for everyone. Sometimes we are too caught up in fear to begin, and sometimes we are just too hard on ourselves to realize that just showing up is the biggest thing, never mind what we *do* when we show up. :)

      If I could convince new students that it’s okay to just show up, sit on the chair and breathe mindfully for the entire class, I’d have grown so much as a teacher. However, I think part of my growth is allowing people to show up, decide it’s not their thing and go on their way. And in my heart, I pray that they do find the practice, be it gardening, walking or breathing that fills their soul. That would make me most happy.

      Lots of love,
      Jane

  5. Charla
    | Reply

    Jane–I have never come across someone who has so elegantly written about my feelings and emotions on “beginning anything.” Our life feelings and experiences are eerily similar (lack of confidence, sensitivity, feeling different, Sjogren’s, autoimmune arthritis, yoga). Thank you for the encouragement to restart yoga classes.

    • Jane Waterman
      | Reply

      Dear Charla,

      I don’t know if you’ll find my note after this much time has passed, but I’m sending it out there and hoping you’ve found your “yoga”, whether it’s in a class or doing some other practice that you feel passionate about, and that brings you joy.

      Many blessings,
      Jane

  6. Heda
    | Reply

    Yay go Jane! There seriously is a need for yoga teacher for us folk with chronic illness. I used to love yoga but now I’ve been diagnosed with osteoporosis it scares the pants off me.

    • Jane Waterman
      | Reply

      Dear Heda,

      I’ve been teaching a few months now, and one thing I’ve learned from looking around the web and in books is that there’s so much that we can do. I hope Anna’s advice helped you, and that you found your way to a class or to some kind of practice that nourishes you and brings you joy.

      Blessings,
      Jane

  7. AnnaDe
    | Reply

    Heda, if you can find “senior” or better yet, “gentle” yoga classes you needn’t worry. I have osteoporosis and Sjogren’s and find they work well for me. The classes have both young and old people in them and folks are urged to only do what they can or feel like that day.

    • Jane Waterman
      | Reply

      Dear Anna,

      I’m sorry I didn’t reply long ago, but I wanted to thank you for offering encouragement to Heda on the previous comment.

      Many blessings,
      Jane

Leave a Reply