6 Responses

  1. Carmen Waterman (@Ca
    | Reply

    You so eloquently describe and explain what so many people do not understand about the chronic fatigue of an autoimmune disorder. I think helping others to understand is the beginning of finding some answers. I am proud of you!

    • Jane
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      Thanks, Sweetie – it would be so wonderful if my thoughts could in some small way open doors of understanding. xxxx

  2. Storeylines
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    Perfectly described – the third and fourth kinds of fatigue are all too familiar to me. Thank you for putting this all down here in a way that, hopefully, everyone can grasp. It is VERY hard to explain the fourth type of fatigue to those who have no experience of an invisible illness. Bless you, my dear Jane! {hugs}

    • Jane
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      I know, hon. It's hard to make the invisible real. I do love when I get an idea for a post and it seems to come out conveying at least some of what I hope to say. It would be nice for people who don't have an invisible illness to understand without them having to suffer to do so! Thank you! *hugs*

  3. Amy Clifton
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    Thank you for this post. I agree that you describe these different types of fatigue very well. I have an autoimmune illness called Primary Biliary Cirrhosis (PBC) , which destroys the small bile ducts in the liver. In the literature I've read that fatigue associated with PBC is different from that associated with other autoimmune diseases, but I've never been clear on how it's different. I know that when I am doing an activity…or even sitting and reading…it's like all of a sudden someone pulls the plug on my energy and, if I am walking, it's suddenly as though I am wearing lead boots. Very strange..

    • Jane
      | Reply

      Thanks so much for writing, Amy. I am glad you've added to the discussion, as I'm sure most people have no concept what it would be like to instantaneously lose access to energy as you describe. I know what it's like to 'shutdown' quite quickly, but when doing nothing at all to cause it – that's a challenge for many to understand, especially those who don't have an autoimmune illness. Thanks for sharing! Many blessings, Jane.

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