9 Responses

  1. Barb
    | Reply

    You have good reason to be proud! I not only read to the end of the list, I truly enjoyed reading it. It is well written (okay, maybe I don't have to tell you that; but seriously, it's so well written, it's a pleasure to read). It's packed full of important information about you and about Invisible Illness, while managing to stay almost light-hearted and accessible to many readers. Okay, that sounds way colder than I wanted it to, but hopefully you'll get what I mean and see it as positive commentary. I love and cherish you and the fact that you choose to share yourself. This piece is worthy of publishing… Not that you haven't been published before… And not that I'm qualified formally to make such a judgement… :) Okay, I think I'd better stop. Writing intelligently is tough after a restless night of sleep and waking. I know, preaching to the choir I am. Love you. Love that you share.

    • Jane
      | Reply

      Thank you, Sweetie – your comment brings me much joy and indeed makes me feel cherished. I so wanted to take part in this, but when I started writing it I thought it might just be too dull and depressing. So I channelled Stephen Fry, and told the facts. I'm so glad it worked.

      You are one of those dear souls I feel so blessed to have in my life. Your loving support means so much to me. I love you even though you used the word 'positive'. ;) It's so difficult to find a suitable replacement for that word!

      Love you too!

      Jane

  2. Carmen Waterman aka
    | Reply

    You are an inspiration and have put this together in a way that adds light to a very hard and difficult reality. It is so important to advocate for those that are suffering and especially when no one else really sees it. You have so much beauty, intelligence and courage and you do make a difference in the lives of many. I am so proud of you and love you so much.

    Believe in yourself, I do and always will. Writing this is so important and sharing it with the world is the kind of open insight that can help to change the world by helping those that so often do not feel they can help themselves.

    • Barb
      | Reply

      Wow, so well said Carmen! We should all be so lucky as to the kind of love and support you two share.

    • Jane
      | Reply

      As the dear lady who deserves a gold medal, there really aren't words to say thank you. I'm certain it's only because of you that I'm still here. Thank you for always showing me such compassion, especially when I can't feel it for myself.

      I love you, for always and for ever.

      Jane

  3. Annette
    | Reply

    Doctors never want to ask about your libido. I say RA has quite a bad effect on it also. Plus the RA often brings Sjogren's as a side effect, but at least that gives us something in common

    My friend has a mental health issue and it has taken her 10 years to get her drugs right.. Now her dad says Just move back home and within 2 years you won't need any medication because your stress will be gone. Needless to say that would never happen

    The National Sjogren's Patient Conference will be held in Toronto in early May 2013. It will be announced on the website https://sjogrenscanada.org/ Just in case you wanted to know this.

    • Jane
      | Reply

      Thanks so much for visiting, Annette, and for your comments – I definitely relate! Thanks also for letting me know about the conference – I haven't travelled in years, but I'm hoping financially and physically being able to do a bit more next year. It would be a dream to go to a conference and network with people who have a common experience.

      Blessings,

      Jane

  4. Annette
    | Reply

    I forgot to say I really like the picture for this post

    • Jane
      | Reply

      Thank you! :)

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